I’m talking about vagina “farts” today, even though they’re technically not farts but trapped air pockets releasing from the vagina. If you didn’t know what a queef is, now you know and you’re welcome. It can happen during or after intercourse or even in a yoga class when air enters the vaginal canal and is eventually forced back out. It’s most common in yoga postures where the pelvis is inverted with the vulva and pelvic floor spreading, which allows the opening to the vagina to open slightly allowing air to enter. Think downdog, dolphin, inversions, even child’s pose and all 4s postures can create space for queefs.

Over the years I’ve had students ask if this means their pelvic floor is weak and the answer is… it depends. Depending on how you’re breathing in certain postures, you may actually be breathing in a manner that is causing downward pressure on the pelvic floor causing the vagina to open slightly sucking air in. Other times it might actually be a weak pelvic floor that’s causing the vagina to open in certain yoga postures.

If it’s a rare occasion it’s probably nothing to worry about, but if it’s a regular occurrence then it might be time to see a pelvic floor physiotherapist like PT Anne Collins Duch (@ptforwomen). I love her work and I’m low key crushing on her IG feed.

If you happen to drop a queef bomb in class, laugh it off and next time get your mula bandha or Core Breath to engage your pelvic floor muscles and keep your yoni active with the breath. Want to learn more about preventing queefs, keep reading…

Queefing happens sometimes! Try as you may, you can’t hold a queef in the same way you can hold in a fart. If you’ve got a vagina, it’s more likely than not that you will experience queefing in your lifetime and there is nothing to be embarrassed about.

Some vaginas queef more than others. The more lubricated your vagina is the more likely queefing is. Hint hint, you’re more likely to queef during your fertile window. It’s a totally normal bodily function that may happen every once in awhile during or after intercourse, especially in certain a positions like doggystyle and “head down, ass up” positions or even missionary with the knees drawn back toward the chest. Don’t apologize if you queef and don’t let it kill the mood, just roll with it and keep on moving.

If, however, you are concerned about frequent queefing, you can practice some pelvic floor exercises and breathing techniques to support a healthy and strong pelvic floor and vaginal muscles. Imagine that you’re trying to suck up a blueberry or egg without crushing it, drawing the vagina muscles upward and inward as you exhale. Inhaling and relaxing your muscles. The focus should be on the lifting and drawing up and in, with equal focus on the relaxation part. Repeat for 2 – 5 minutes, stopping if the muscles become tired or if you begin to incorporate other muscles such as your abdominals, glutes (butt), inner or outer thighs. Always perform with breathwork, inhaling and lifting, exhaling and releasing.

Have you ever queefed? How do you respond when and if you do? Let me know in the comments✌🏾&🖤.

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